Sentimentally Ill


My name is Amanda and I like petting kitties

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Ask me shit

Send me shit

So last night I got drunk and played Skyrim

unregistered-hypercam2:

karlosmadera:

I’m still torn on whether this is the greatest thing I’ve ever done or the stupidest. 

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this is dangerously unfunny

Source: karlosmadera

Source: pleatedjeans

shiba500:

making flat shiba

Source: instagram.com

fvckthisreality:

zacharielaughingalonewithsalad:

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies.

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy.

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

reblogging for the sweet history lesson

Reblogging because of the History lesson and because the masks, the masks are cool

Source: creepylittleworld

becausebirds:

whatthefauna:

This male pink-necked green pigeon is proof of paternal care in the animal kingdom. Happy Father’s Day!
Image credit: Ric Seet

best dad bird ever.

becausebirds:

whatthefauna:

This male pink-necked green pigeon is proof of paternal care in the animal kingdom. Happy Father’s Day!

Image credit: Ric Seet

best dad bird ever.

Source: whatthefauna

gentlemanbones:

Please add more unwarranted explosions to gifs. It’s my favorite.

gentlemanbones:

Please add more unwarranted explosions to gifs. It’s my favorite.

Source: best-pics-gifs.com

me-thehomicidalmaniac:

elsen-lied:

SO I MAKE ONE POST ASKING YOU GUYS TO REMIND ME WHEN IT’S BEEN TWO HOURS TO TAKE MY LASAGNA OUT OF THE OVEN AND

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I’M NEVER ASKING YOU ALL FOR HELP AGAIN 

but did you remember to take the lasagna out

Source: lizclimo

snekysnek:

jumpingjacktrash:

invertebrates:

Six-Eyed Sand Spider Burying Herself (x)

NO that flop’n wiggle

digdigdigdigdig FOOP!

this shit is how my phobia ended

Source: larvitarr

asylum-art:

NeSpoon Polska: Lace Street Art
  on Behance
Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing. You can see much more over Warsaw-based artist NeSpoon uses ornate lace patterns in her unique brand of street art that translates into ceramics, stencils, paintings, and crocheted webbing installed in public spaces. NeSpoon refers to her art as “public jewelry,” specifically as an act of beautification by turning abandoned and unadorned spaces into something aesthetically pleasing.

Source: asylum-art

wrcsolace:

coreydrake:

caterpillarsend:

This isn’t supposed to happen to people like me, I’m a good person.

WHY IS THIS GIF SET STILL RELEVANT TWENTY FUCKING YEARS LATER?

Somebody should tell that to Tyler Perry

^^^^^^

Source: wigglemore

squidnapped:

surprise-adoption:

my kind of skyrim

#finally skyrim is playable

squidnapped:

surprise-adoption:

my kind of skyrim

Source: surprise-adoption

trashboat:

why do people post missed connections on craigslist when they could just write it on a piece of paper and throw it out the window with roughly the same probability that the other person would actually read it and you would eliminate the possibility of internet teens making fun of you for notes

Source: trashboat

hophigh:

inner—utopia:

Bless that one person in every group that is like “keep going, I’m listening” and encourages you to finish your story even when everyone else is talking over you.

Source: inner--utopia

nosdrinker:

android1994:

nosdrinker:

where’s the gif of the chef with the really big frying pan

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bless you

Source: nosdrinker